Lugmacorv
Lugmacorv
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silensy:


2005-2014

Good lord, this is the most stark portrayal I’ve seen of this.
silensy:


2005-2014

Good lord, this is the most stark portrayal I’ve seen of this.
Make Your Own Nut Milk and Butters With This Visual Guide
How Australia Became the Dirtiest Polluter in the Developed World | Mother Jones
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archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
archiemcphee:

70-year-old Xu Shuquan is a retired primary school teacher from the city of Chengdu in Sichuan province who has spent the past 60 years practicing Zhezhi, the traditional Chinese art of paper folding. Shugan has been folding paper planes since he was 10 years old and has amassed an awesome collection of 10,000 paper planes of various sizes, shapes and colors. Unlike Japanese origami, which primarily focuses on creating animals and flowers, Chinese paper folding concentrates mainly on objects, such as boats, hats, or in this case, airplanes.

…Xu put his knowledge of Zhezhi to good use during his teaching career: “When children were naughty or not paying attention, I would get their attention by folding a simple paper dart with a message on it and flying it to them,” he said. “The planes got more and more complicated and the children seemed to love them.” The trick would backfire at times because his students loved the planes so much that they would create a ruckus on purpose.

Shuquan hopes to hold an exhibition of his Zhezhi creations in hopes of reviving an art form which he feels has been eclipsed in the western world by Japanese origami.

“My biggest hope is to hold my own exhibition where people can learn more about the traditional art.”

[via Oddity Central]
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From g+
Andrew Moyers
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AndrewMoyersnow/posts
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minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
minkahsieh:

Day269-279 Henan-Beijing, China 河南to北京
The last part ride in China! Got many problems but now I am in Beijing for a long vacation  
—
在中國騎行的最後一段路程,但又是問題一堆堆,不過我現在正在北京享受著長假吶~ 
+
My Favorite Bicycle Touring Blogs of 2014 | Adventure Cycling Association
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archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
archiemcphee:

Today the Departments of Awesome Parenting and Impossible Cuteness met to squee in delight at the outrageously adorable and elaborate charaben (character bento) lunches created by Li Ming, Singapore-based mother of two lucky sons. Ming began making these exceptional midday meals when her eldest son, 10-year-old Ivan Tey, was having a hard time adjusting to starting school:

'He refused to go to school and cried everyday - he was not used to the longer hours and missed me. I packed him charabens with written messages to make him feel more secure.”

It wasn’t long before her youngest son, Lucas Tey, started asking for special lunches too:

"Lucas saw one of them and asked for one to take to kindergarten and he really enjoyed the attention he got from his teachers and friends. I ended up decorating either their lunch or dinner instead and they eat those at home. They still enjoy looking at what I make and will give comments at times on how I can position certain parts."

Li Ming has now made over 100 delightful charaben meals for her sons. Sometimes her inspiration comes from everyday life and other times share uses ideas suggested by her kids.
Visit Li Ming’s Flickr stream to check out many more of her amazing bento creations.
[via Demilked and The Daily Mail]
+