Lugmacorv
Lugmacorv
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viewfromthetent:

Waking up in Big Sur. 
We're Compiling Every Police-Involved Shooting In America. Help Us.
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tnbounces:

corsair
tnbounces:

corsair
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nickmlarson:

ethically-wrong:

mmmmbeefy96:

grandhowler:

Dude

holy shit. 
this is on a whole new level of patience

This is natural art.

This is incredible
nickmlarson:

ethically-wrong:

mmmmbeefy96:

grandhowler:

Dude

holy shit. 
this is on a whole new level of patience

This is natural art.

This is incredible
nickmlarson:

ethically-wrong:

mmmmbeefy96:

grandhowler:

Dude

holy shit. 
this is on a whole new level of patience

This is natural art.

This is incredible
nickmlarson:

ethically-wrong:

mmmmbeefy96:

grandhowler:

Dude

holy shit. 
this is on a whole new level of patience

This is natural art.

This is incredible
+
Watch "American Nomads" on YouTube
Watch "Jay Austin's Beautiful, Illegal Tiny House" on YouTube
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mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM
mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana
Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine
During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”
While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.
Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK
Photos by Bob Wick, BLM